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Our Msc Coaching Student, Ian McGowan tells of his Loughborough Experience in the Irish CA Newsletter


30 May, 2012

Published in the Cricket Ireland Coaches Association Spring Newsletter 2012

Ian McGowan is a coach from Saintfield Cricket Club, who attended an ECB Coach Level Two course in Campbell College in 2010, and has recently attended the Coach Development Workshops held at the La Mon Hotel, Grosvenor School and Campbell again in early 2012.

He is currently in England studying at Loughborough:

“Since graduating from Queens University in July life has taken a demanding yet thrilling new direction. I successfully applied to study a Masters in Sports Coaching at Loughborough University and was fortunate to secure my coaching placement with the Loughborough MCCU squad for the 2011/12 season.

Loughborough MCCU is a programme established to develop talented cricketers who study at the University. The MCCU side is based in the National Cricket Performance Centre within the Loughborough Campus.

The scheme enables students to become part of a semi- professional unit whilst furthering their educational needs. The programme offers specialist coaching, advice on nutrition, strength and conditioning and sports psychology.

The impressive facilities at the National Cricket Performance Centre boast six indoor lanes with CCTV Hawk Eye technology to assist in video analysis , more than a dozen bowling machines incorporating “ Merlin Spin “ technology and a specialist fielding area.

Some household names that have passed through the programme are Monty Panesar (Sussex and England), Jimmy Adams (Hampshire) and Chris Nash (Sussex).

All of the current players in the MCCU have represented their respective counties and in a number of cases competed internationally. Currently we have four professionally contracted men’s players and three players on tour in New Zealand playing for the England Women’s Team.

My role allows me to observe and work alongside the Men’s and Women’s Head Coaches, Alan Duncan, Katherine Brunt and Salliann Briggs and some of the England performance coaching team including Carl Crowe (Spin), Chris Taylor (Fielding) and Chris Rossimus (Nutritionist).

Observing these top coaches, being able to reflect on their coaching and having opportunities to ask questions has been instrumental in the development and progression of my coaching and especially my coaching philosophy.

My role as the MCCU coaching intern is somewhat varied but typically includes planning and implementing coaching sessions and specialist one to one or small group coaching with the men’s and women’s squads.

All coaches will have a philosophy based on core beliefs and values about coaching which perhaps stems from a career as a player, past experiences as a coach or from coach education.

This understanding is key to providing direction and focus to my coaching and without it, there is difficulty in knowing what I represent as a coach represent.

Coaching like playing is multifaceted, dynamic and diverse. It is characterised by a number of variables such as player and coach motivation, skill level, attitude, concentration, quality of opponents and playing conditions. The importance of being flexible and truly appreciating player individuality is often overlooked.

Instead, the notion that one coach can simply apply a generic style of coaching across domains is all too commonly adopted. This reductionist approach presents an under appreciation of the complexities inherent within the coaching process.

The best coaches that I have worked with during my time at Loughborough are critical of the knowledge that they acquire from the observation of other coaches or coach education.

They ensure that before applying their new knowledge, drill or practice that it fits with their core beliefs underpinning their coaching philosophy, they think about the players, the context that they are working within and their intended learning outcomes.

My time at Loughborough to date has been absorbing and a major step in my development as a coach. I would like to take this opportunity to encourage all coaches to allow time to reflect on their coaching practices.

I have learnt that coaches must continually challenge themselves and strive to improve the quality of their own performance therefore promoting a focus
 on the needs of the athlete throughout the coaching process.”

 


Ian McGowan is a coach from Saintfield Cricket Club, who attended an ECB Coach Level Two course in Campbell College in 2010, and has recently attended the Coach Development Workshops held at the La Mon Hotel, Grosvenor School and Campbell again in early 2012.

He is currently in England studying at Loughborough:

“Since graduating from Queens University in July life has taken a demanding yet thrilling new direction. I successfully applied to study a Masters in Sports Coaching at Loughborough University and was fortunate to secure my coaching placement with the Loughborough MCCU squad for the 2011/12 season.

Loughborough MCCU is a programme established to develop talented cricketers who study at the University. The MCCU side is based in the National Cricket Performance Centre within the Loughborough Campus.

The scheme enables students to become part of a semi- professional unit whilst furthering their educational needs. The programme offers specialist coaching, advice on nutrition, strength and conditioning and sports psychology.

The impressive facilities at the National Cricket Performance Centre boast six indoor lanes with CCTV Hawk Eye technology to assist in video analysis , more than a dozen bowling machines incorporating “ Merlin Spin “ technology and a specialist fielding area.

Some household names that have passed through the programme are Monty Panesar (Sussex and England), Jimmy Adams (Hampshire) and Chris Nash (Sussex).

All of the current players in the MCCU have represented their respective counties and in a number of cases competed internationally. Currently we have four professionally contracted men’s players and three players on tour in New Zealand playing for the England Women’s Team.

My role allows me to observe and work alongside the Men’s and Women’s Head Coaches, Alan Duncan, Katherine Brunt and Salliann Briggs and some of the England performance coaching team including Carl Crowe (Spin), Chris Taylor (Fielding) and Chris Rossimus (Nutritionist).

Observing these top coaches, being able to reflect on their coaching and having opportunities to ask questions has been instrumental in the development and progression of my coaching and especially my coaching philosophy.

My role as the MCCU coaching intern is somewhat varied but typically includes planning and implementing coaching sessions and specialist one to one or small group coaching with the men’s and women’s squads.

All coaches will have a philosophy based on core beliefs and values about coaching which perhaps stems from a career as a player, past experiences as a coach or from coach education.

This understanding is key to providing direction and focus to my coaching and without it, there is difficulty in knowing what I represent as a coach represent.

Coaching like playing is multifaceted, dynamic and diverse. It is characterised by a number of variables such as player and coach motivation, skill level, attitude, concentration, quality of opponents and playing conditions. The importance of being flexible and truly appreciating player individuality is often overlooked.

Instead, the notion that one coach can simply apply a generic style of coaching across domains is all too commonly adopted. This reductionist approach presents an under appreciation of the complexities inherent within the coaching process.

The best coaches that I have worked with during my time at Loughborough are critical of the knowledge that they acquire from the observation of other coaches or coach education.

They ensure that before applying their new knowledge, drill or practice that it fits with their core beliefs underpinning their coaching philosophy, they think about the players, the context that they are working within and their intended learning outcomes.

My time at Loughborough to date has been absorbing and a major step in my development as a coach. I would like to take this opportunity to encourage all coaches to allow time to reflect on their coaching practices.

I have learnt that coaches must continually challenge themselves and strive to improve the quality of their own performance therefore promoting a focus
 on the needs of the athlete throughout the coaching process.”